Identification of skin sensitizers in natural mixtures

This pilot study demonstrated the applicability of the GARDTMskin assay for identification of skin sensitizers in hair dye ingredients, delivering high prediction performance, consistent with existing human data.

The study also indicated that GARDTMskin is a promising in vitro model to identify skin sensitizers in natural mixtures.

Link to Application Note.

Extended applicability domain with new solvent selection for the GARD platform

Jenvert RM, Larne O, TorstensdotterMattssonU. I., Johansson H, SenzaGen, Lund, Sweden

Introduction
The Genomic Allergen Rapid Detection (GARD) assay is a state of the art in vitro assay developed for the assessment of skin sensitizers. It is based on gene expression analysis of SenzaCells, a human myeloid cell line, after stimulation by the test item.
During the development of the GARD platform, two solvents were used; DMSO (0.1%) and Water. To increase the applicability domain of GARD® and the solubility of certain test items, for e.g. Medical Device extracts and UVCBs, we here show a broader range of solvents compatible with GARD.

Conclusions
Here, we show that the GARD® platform is compatible with the following solvents:
• Acetone
• Ethanol
• Glycerol
• Super refined olive oil

• DMF
• DMSO
• Water
• Isopropanol

Poster download

Exploration of the GARD® applicability domain – Sensitization assessment of UVCBs

U. I. Torstensdotter Mattson, C. Humfrey, O. Larne, H. Johansson, L. Sweet
SenzaGen, Lund, Sweden, Lubrizol, Derbyshire, United Kingdom, Lubrizol, Ohio, United States of America

Introduction
The GARD – Genomic Allergen Rapid Detection – platform is a state of the art in vitro assay for assessment of chemical sensitizers. The GARD®skin assay is a powerful tool for assessment of chemical sensitizers, with a predictive accuracy of 94%. In this study, four UVCB test items, provided by Lubrizol and selected based on existing in vivo data (internal Lubrizol data), were evaluated. Sensitizing hazard was assessed using the GARD®skin assay, and the GARD®potency assay further subcategorized the sensitizers into strong (1A) or weak (1B) sensitizers according to GHS/CLP classification. Here we show the importance of using appropriate vehicles in order to predict a correct classification of Test items.

 

Conclusion
A UVCB Test item with poor water and DMSO solubility was assessed using a mixture of vehicles with different polarity indexes (DMF and Glycerol 1:1). This experimental vehicle mixture classified the UVCB as a skin sensitizer, being consistent with the in vivo data. This case study demonstrates the broadening of the applicability domain of the GARD -assay when assessing UVCBs.

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The use of GARDskin for sensitization evaluation of cosmetic ingredients and ‘real-life’ mixtures

Renato Ivan de Ávila, Tim Lindbergh, Malin Lindstedt and Marize Campos Valadares
Lab. of Education and Research in Pharmacology and Cellular Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Federal University of Goiás, Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil.
Department of Immunotechnology, Medicon Village, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.

 

Introduction
Genomic fingerprints in dendritic cells after chemical exposure is a recent strategy in in vitro techniques for skin sensitization hazard. Within this perspective, Genomic Allergen Rapid Detection (GARDskinTM), an assay based on a support vector machine (SVM) model, was developed for identifying contact allergens using a myeloid cell line as a surrogate for dendritic cells. Predictive system behind the GARDskin™ consists on the transcriptional quantitative analysis of 200 genes, referred as the GARDskin™ prediction signature. Mechanistically, GARDskin™ is linked to key event 3 “Activation of DCs”, as defined by the Adverse Outcome Pathways for skin sensitization published in 2012 by OECD (https://read.oecd-ilibrary.org/environment/the-adverse-outcome-pathway-for-skin-sensitisation-initiated-by-covalent-binding-to-proteins_9789264221444-en#page1)

 

Resluts
Information declared on the label and lawsone and PDD levels found in ten commercial henna-based hair coloring cosmetics are show in Table 1. Since all products analyzed were declared as henna cosmetics by the manufactures, the presence of LAW, the main active phytochemical of henna, was then expected in all samples. However, HPLC analysis showed no LAW level in the product nº 2, suggesting falsification. Furthermore, the presence of PPD was declared on the products nº 2 and 8 only by the manufactures. However, this substance was detected in all products, suggesting undisclosed adulteration.

Poster:
The use of GARDskin for sensitization evaluation of cosmetic ingredients and ‘real-life’ mixtures